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Congratulations Lisa! Our boys really enjoyed being part of the awards and reading all the terrific books. Thank you to all the amazing authors and looking forward to next year!


Retweetd From Southwark Book Award

She did indeed! Southwark Book Award 2018 goes to Lisa Thompson for her brilliant debut THE GOLDFISH BOY! Voting was close but clear! Well done students from , you read, you judged, you chose!


We're soooo to have received two educational outcomes awards from - one for being in the top 20% of schools for student attainment in 2017, and the second for being in the top 10% for student progress. Great work boys, parents, staff, governors...!


Retweetd From Harris Garrard

We love celebrating reading at Harris Garrard! Can you guess which books we have popped out of?


We're very impressed by this that Yaseen made as part of a 'stretch and challenge' task for . The creativeness of the resources used is very impressive. And it sounds great!


Retweetd From Southwark Book Award

We announce this year's Southwark Book Award shortlist : BOOKED, GOLDFISH BOY, WELCOME TO NOWHERE, THE HUNTRESS: SEA, SHADOW MAGIC & LIE KILL WALK AWAY. Southwark students currently deep in reading & judging mode!


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Director of Maths required .Apply now


Retweetd From Harris Careers

Harris Boys Academy East Dulwich is looking for an Innovation Leader for Geography. Apply now


Axel, Markell and Hassan are the first of our pupils to have been awarded over 4,000 Harris Points so far this year – a fantastic effort! Read about the rewards they get at


Because of the continuing cold weather the school will be closed on Friday 2 March except for students in years 10-11, who should come in at the usual time. However, school will end at 2pm to give the boys in years 10-11 more time to get home safely. Thank you.


Due to bad weather the school will be closed today, Thursday 1 March. Because of technical issues we're having some problems updating our website with this information just now but to confirm the school is closed today. Apologies for the inconvenience.


Interested in 's Republic? Why making mistakes is good for you? 's Principia? What is community? What makes British values? Take a look at our assembly presentations which cover all these and more. Downloadable from


Our teachers have compiled subject-by-subject resources for all our Year 11s. Lots to look. Visit - hope you find them helpful


In only 102 schools across England and Wales do students who are eligible for free school meals perform as well or better than other students. And we're very proud to be one of them


We're proud to have received the national for the 2nd time. It's given to schools championing equality and is recognised by Ofsted. It shows that EVERY boy will be supported to succeed. Find out more at


Retweetd From Harris Federation

Schools Standards Minister says Harris Federation is ‘leading the way’ on delivering excellent results for pupils


Really proud of our boys and staff for being 3rd out of 55 similar schools nationally in today's Department for Education figures, and in top 6% for student progress. Amazing work!


Retweetd From James Barber

Secondary school added value league tables out today - E.Dulwich very fortunate to have


We're really looking forward to welcoming author Phil Earle () to our academy on Tues 30 Jan. He'll be talking about his love of writing, Frazzles and Hull - among other things

Harris Academies
All Academies in our Federation aim to transform the lives of the students they serve by bringing about rapid improvement in examination results, personal development and aspiration.


All students in the academy are assessed regularly, with a formal assessment at least once per term.

These tests aim to develop students' exam technique and enable them to demonstrate depth of knowledge, critical thought and, for many subjects, their practical skills. Most importantly, they are used to help gauge progress and to take action to improve your son’s learning and progress.

In order to keep you informed about your son’s/ward's progress, we will report back to you at three points during the academic year - one report for every term. These reports will summarise the academic (based on the termly assessments) and non-academic progress your son has made.

What a report looks like

You can download an annotated version of a sample Year 7 report (pictured below) which highlights the key elements.

Year 7 sample report 24.3.16

The report has seven main components:

(a)    The first is the literacy scores your son has achieved against four key literacy criteria, on a scale of 1-4 with 4 being ‘outstanding’ and 1 being ‘cause for concern.’  This is then presented as an overall literacy score out of 16.

(b)    The second is the ‘Attitude to Learning’ score which reflects the commitment, resilience, optimism, reflectiveness, resourcefulness, reciprocity towards their own learning.

(c)   The third element is an attendance and punctuality summary. The goal for 2015-16 is that every student achieves at least 98% attendance and is always punctual.

(d)   The fourth element is a summary of Harris points which reflects the points accrued in the full array of positive student actions including gentlemanly behaviour, bringing the right equipment to every lesson, and showing a thirst for learning.

(e)     The fifth element is a summary of the behaviour points accrued, a summary of sanctions your son has received and the boundary that they are within – which summarises the support they are receiving to correct any unacceptable behaviour.

(f)    The sixth element is your son’s academic progress. This is presented as a test % which converts into a ‘most likely grade’ (MLG) which is based purely on the test % (NOTE: the grade boundaries will vary from subject to subject and from one assessment to the next dependent on the course).

This is then compared to their target grade (which is formulated from their KS2 level – and the expectation that they will make one grade progress above the national average) and the minimum attainment baseline which stems from the data published by the Department for Education (DfE) for the pupils to make the average (or average expected) progress. On reports, pupils have a progress status that is made against the DfE data.

If their progress status is above 0, that means they are making progress above what would be expected, which is good. If their progress status is +0.29 and above, their progress is much higher than the national average which is outstanding. The teacher also records a ‘Teacher Most Likely Grade’ (TMLG) which is a prediction of the grade the teacher believes the student is likely to achieve at the end of Y11 based upon their assessments, classwork and homework. The grades for these students on their courses will be presented as letters and/or numbers dependent upon their year group and course due to them taking the ‘new’ GCSEs. There will also be pass, merit and distinction grades for our approved vocational courses.

(g) The final element is a teacher comment which will provide a target for improvement. Each student will receive at least one target from each subject once per academic year.

What grade should my son be achieving?

The minimum expected grade is complicated as it is based on the actual marks in KS2 tests (or CATs tests for pupils who did not sit KS2 test) rather than the levels. Our target grades are based on the latest DfE tables, with the target being formulated by our expectation that pupils can achieve one grade higher than the national average. 

Your son’s target grade reflects our expectation that they can meet or exceed at least a grade higher than the national average. Results from previous years show that the majority of HBAED pupils far exceed the national expectations and so these targets are aspirational but realistic.

As the tests are designed to cover material that has been taught, we would expect pupils to be able to achieve their target grade at each assessment point. Therefore, maintaining their target grade in a following assessment point would demonstrate that they have made progress because they will have achieved that grade having been tested on a greater quantity of topics. Exceeding their target grade would be exceptional as it would show that they are achieving well beyond expectations.

What happens after the assessments have taken place?

After the assessments have taken place, teachers will review progress in teams and with pupils. Teachers will share the grades as well as strengths and areas to improve with pupils. We expect all pupils to take time to reflect on their progress and to ensure they take the actions needed to improve.

At HBAED, we have a fluid banding (setting) cycle which works in tandem with the assessment cycle. After the assessment point, teachers sit down with Directors in English, Mathematics and Science and review the current ability bands pupils are in. They use the assessment data but will also discuss classwork and homework in making decisions about any banding changes. The curriculum has been designed so that the blocks for English, Maths and Science are independent of one another. We understand that learning is not linear and this system allows for pupils to change the band they are in 2-3 times a year and for different subjects. The aim of this is to ensure the pace of the lesson best suits their learning needs and it maximises the chances of them achieving excellent grades by the end of Year 11.   

Our assessment and grading systems explained

Due to the changes in GCSE specifications we have adapted our assessments and grading systems so that they adhere to the new specification requirements. We have worked with the Harris Federation and, having consulted exam boards, we are moving towards a model where all of our termly assessments are externally set, standardised and graded. The table below summarises the externally set and graded assessments currently. See below for an explanation of the table.

Subject Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
Art Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid HBAED HBAED
Dance Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid HBAED
Drama Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid HBAED
English Language HF HF HF HF HF
English Literature HF HF HF HF HF
French         HBAED
Hospitality and Catering HBAED HBAED HBAED HBAED HBAED
Mathematics HF HF HF HF HF
Music Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid HBAED
Physical Education Hybrid Hybrid HBAED HBAED HBAED
Religious Studies HF HF HF HF HBAED
Additional Science  HF HF HF HF HBAED
Further Additional Science  HF HF HF HF HBAED
Travel & Tourism     HBAED HBAED HBAED
Citizenship     HBAED HBAED HBAED

All assessments marked 'HF' in the table above are set by specialist consultants from the Harris Federation and will be unseen by teachers at our academy. Pupils work on a scheme of work that has been specially adapted for the year group and develops the knowledge and skills over time to best prepare them for their terminal assessments in Y11. The % scores for each externally set exam are then standardised and grade boundaries created for each % based on a model which has been developed in consultation with exam boards. This means the grade is an accurate prediction of what the pupil is likely to achieve as the model distributes grades against a national model.

All assessments for years 10 and 11 marked ‘HBAED’ in the table above are past papers from exam boards (or section of papers). The grade boundaries that these are based on are taken from the exam board and converted into grade 1-9 using the Ofqual conversion % guidance. Each GCSE subject therefore has its own tailored grade boundaries which takes into account the trends within the course and national changes.

All assessments marked ‘HBAED’ in other year groups are set by the Director for the subject and for the Spring and Summer exams are verified by the senior leadership team as a quality assurance process. The grade boundaries for these are also based on national grade boundaries (as in years 10 and 11).

Assessments marked ‘Hybrid’ are those that cover our practical courses. These use Assessment Objective criteria set externally by Harris Federation consultants and lead teachers. Pupils need to demonstrate the skills within this criteria to achieve the Assessment Objective. These assessment objectives are than converted into a % which will equate to a grade either set by the Harris Federation grading standardisation process (as with nearly all new GCSEs) or converted against the subject and exam board grade boundaries (as with ‘HBAED’ Y10 and Y11 assessments). 

Defining low, middle and high attainers

Key Stage 4 Performance Tables

Definitions are based on the Key Stage 2 test results attained by pupils on completion of the primary school phase:

  • Low attaining = those below Level 4 in the KS2 tests
  • Middle attaining = those at Level 4 in the KS2 tests
  • High attaining = those above Level 4 in the KS2 tests

Key Stage 2 results used to calculate prior attainment

From 2017 onwards, reading and mathematics test results only will be used in calculating Key Stage 2 prior attainment fine levels for use in Progress 8. For 2016 and for 2015 for schools opting in early to Progress 8, overall English and mathematics Key Stage 2 test results were used to calculate prior attainment. This is summarised in the table below.

Progress 8 measure by year



KS4 Cohort

KS2 Cohort

KS2 tests used in calculating prior attainment fine level bands



English and mathematics



English and mathematics



Reading and mathematics



Reading and mathematics

For the Key Stage 4 tables, where we are looking at Key Stage 2 prior attainment, we calculate the pupil’s average points score and classify those with a points score of less than 24 as low; those between 24 and 29.99 as middle, and those with 30 or more as high attaining.

Where teacher assessment is used as a proxy for test results, we take the whole level and allocate the appropriate points relating to the mid-range of the level.

The Key Stage 2 data helps us to allocate pupils to appropriate groups when they first arrive to the academy and enables us to support pupils more effectively. For example, lower ability pupils may have extra scaffolding to help them to understand concepts and higher ability pupils may be invited to specialist ‘stretch and challenge’ workshops.

For a more in-depth explanation of our assessment policy, you can download our assessment policy from our teaching and learning page. As this is the second year of our new assessment regime, this policy will be updated regularly as we continue to embed, evaluate and improve the new system.